Cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder, affecting movement and posture

Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term that describes a group of conditions affecting the developing infant or child’s brain. It is the most common physical disability in childhood. Cerebral palsy results from damage to the brain that occurs during pregnancy; around the time of birth; or within the first two years after birth.

How cerebral palsy affects a child will vary depending on the extent and location (in the brain) of the damage and the age of the child when the damage occurs. It is a lifelong condition, affecting movement and posture, although these features are often accompanied by other difficulties.

The current most widely accepted technical definition is by Rosenbaum and colleagues below. This was developed in 2007 by consensus of a group of international experts.

Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of permanent dis-orders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. The motor disorders of cerebral palsy are often accompanied by disturbances of sensation, perception, cognition, communication, and behaviour, by epilepsy, and by secondary musculoskeletal problems.

Rosenbaum et al 2007

All children with cerebral palsy have problems with movement as the main difficulty. Cerebral palsy can also affect sensation, perception, learning, communication, and eating and drinking. In some children, all of these functions are affected, but other children may have difficulties in only one of these areas.

The damage affects the messages being sent from the brain to the muscles and back again, and the way in which the brain interprets the information it receives. This affects how the muscles work, and how a baby moves and interacts with the world around them. Although the damage in the brain is permanent and unchanging, how the damage affects a baby or child can vary or change depending on many things, including their experiences.

Everything we do requires movement so, put simply, cerebral palsy can make ordinary activities that most of us take for granted, difficult. This can include walking, talking, chewing and swallowing, dressing and fine motor skills such as writing, using a knife and fork, and doing up buttons.

Every baby with cerebral palsy is unique with their own particular strengths and challenges.

How we have helped in Wales

110

Family support appointments took place in 2018-19

286

Children from across Wales have been treated during 2018-19

1,682

The number of sessions of specialist therapy we delivered in 2018-19

Clara With Mum Sera Jane

Clara’s story

When we completed our first baby block of 6 weeks of therapy at Cerebral Palsy Cymru’s therapy centre it was a life-changer. We are truly grateful to have found such help and guidance amongst the darkness, we can now look forward to the future, thanks to Cerebral Palsy Cymru.

- Family Story

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Pam Perry

I started to Bake for Bobath in 2014 as a fun way of saying thank you to Bobath for the amazing therapy they have given my granddaughter.

Held at home, a small gathering of friends with plenty of cake and coffee plus donations, £97.00, not bad I thought. Still held at home it is an annual event on m…

- Volunteer Fundraiser

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Sienna’s story

The early intervention programme, has been such a comfort to us as we were doing something positive from pretty much day one for Sienna. The support and comfort that Cerebral Palsy Cymru provides means that the therapy doesn’t just stop with the child who receives it, the whole family benefits.

- Family Story

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Fred Soper

Bobath to me means I can give something back to my community. I was a customer at Crwys road and liked the atmosphere that the manager created. The volunteers are happy and the manager is kind-hearted and good with everyone so when I got the opportunity to volunteer my first choice was Bobath.

I esp…

- Volunteer

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Ffion’s story

Each visit to Cerebral Palsy Cymru’s therapy centre in Cardiff meant a 130-mile round trip to get to the centre but it was well worth it. The sessions were a great tool and taught us how to help Ffion and how to continue with her physiotherapy at home.

- Family Story

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